The Context //

The Biophilia thesis

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What if we were deep into our DNA linked to the Natural world we grew in?

Behind this question, lays the Biophilia thesis, that was brought to light by the American biologist Edward O. Wilson 35 years ago.

The Biophilia thesis

In his work Biophilia (1984), he proposed that the tendency of humans to focus on and to affiliate with nature and other life-forms has, in part, a genetic basis. 

It is the innate, hereditary emotional attraction of humans to all living organisms on Earth, and to nature.

"Deeply encrypted in our genes, we need to connect, to relate, to affiliate with Nature. We are predisposed to bond to the natural world."

This original nature-based evolutionary genetic coding and instincts are still an essential part of us and continue to shape our behavior and responses to nature (Lewis, 1969).

 

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Deeply encrypted in our genes, we need to connect, to relate, to affiliate with Nature. We are predisposed to bond to the natural world.

The hypothesis helps explain why ordinary people care for and sometimes risk their lives to save domestic and wild animals and keep plants and flowers in and around their homes. In other words, our natural love for life helps sustain life.

Very often, flowers also indicate potential for food later. Most fruits start their development as flowers. For our ancestors, it was crucial to spot, detect and remember the plants that would later provide nutrition.

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